How to Make an Acoustic Pop Filter


As I've said in my previous post, I tinker around with audio recordings at home, which is why I made my own acoustic-absorption box. So I saw no reason why I couldn't also make a pop filter for my microphone.

There are plenty of websites out there that will show you various ways you can make your own microphone acoustic pop filter just by using things laying around the house. However, I will also post my own version here, because I think it serves as an excellent example of how you can save money and reduce waste by reusing things to make something functional.



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I Used:

How to Make an Acoustic Pop Filter
A flat-tip screwdriver, pliers, electrical tape, a left over coil of wire, an old hose clamp, a basic wire clothes hanger, and an old (clean) pair of nylon socks.
How I Did It:
How to Make an Acoustic Pop Filter
1. I used the pliers to cut a section out of the wire hanger, then bent it into an L shape to create a base for my filter. I also bent a short section of the end so it ran parallel to the long side of the L.

The acrylic layer around the hanger wire was easy to remove by simply cutting shallow notches in it with the pliers and twisting the pieces off.







How to Make an Acoustic Pop Filter
2. I attached the thin wire coil to the hanger wire simply by twisting the ends around each other until it held firmly. Then I wrapped the hanger wire with electrical tape to make it more aesthetically pleasing.

I wanted it in black, but I only had grey tape, so I just painted over it with some left over back acrylic paint.








How to Make an Acoustic Pop Filter
3. After the paint dried, I slipped both nylon socks over the wire coil. I then secured the "filter" with a ribbon around the base of the coil, and cut off the excess fabric. Securing the filter with a ribbon probably doesn't make it look that professional, but I don't mind. It works, and it allows me to easily change the fabric later on if I want to.

One sock may be enough, but I tend to speak rather forcefully, so I thought an extra layer couldn't hurt. Also, you may recognize the ribbon as left over from when I made a cork board out of wine corks.






How to Make an Acoustic Pop Filter4. I secured my new pop filter to the base of my microphone by tightening a hose clamp around it using the flat-tip screwdriver. First I taped some paper around the base of the microphone to protect it from scratches.

Can you believe this hose clamp has been in the tool box for over 20 years? Whoever left it in there probably never thought it would later be repurposed to be used with audio equipment.
How to Make an Acoustic Pop Filter
Adjusted the height of the filter and microphone a little, and I was done!

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An average pop filter is only about $15-$20, but why spend money when I had all the tools at home to make my own for free? Again, don't be so quick to throw things away, you know never what they can be used for later on.

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