How to Make Natural Deodorants


 
How to Make a Natural Deodorants
I've written several posts on how to make your own natural deodorants, so I thought it would be helpful to consolidate the links all into one entry for those who are looking for different options on how to make their own. Here they are!

How to Make Natural Deodorant Powder

How to Make Natural Spray-On Deodorant

How to Make Natural Deodorant with Coconut Oil

How to Unclog a Drain Using Natural Ingredients


If you are experiencing the unpleasantness of a clogged drain, no need to pour chemical-laden cleaning products down the sink in order to fix the problem. That stuff is so potent that you can smell the toxins in it just from opening the bottle. Needless to say, it's incredibly bad for your health and the chemicals eventually end up in the environment after they've done their job.

How to Unclog a Drain Using Natural Ingredients

To unclog a drain in a more environmentally friendly manner, all you need are a couple of my favorite natural home-cleaning ingredients: baking soda and white vinegar.

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You'll Need:

- baking soda
- white vinegar (although really any vinegar would work just fine)

Directions:

1. Pour 1/2 cup of baking soda down the drain.
2. Pour 3/4 cup of vinegar into the drain.
3. Allow the two ingredients to react and bubble up into the sink. A warning, it won't smell very pleasant.
4. Once all the bubbling has subsided, pour hot water down the drain.

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This natural solution works well for most drains clogs. However, if you have a drain that is blocked with a large hairball or other obstruction, even the strongest commercial drain cleaner won't help you. I'm afraid then you will have to deal with the unpleasantness of snaking the drain ... then remember to invest in a drain cover to prevent it from happening again.

How to Make Natural Spray-On Deodorant


I've written posts on how to make your own solid deodorant and powder deodorant, so I thought it was time that I also wrote a post on how you can create your own natural spray-on deodorant. You can do this using one of two main ingredients: vodka or apple cider vinegar / white vinegar.

How to Make Natural Spray-On Deodorant

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For vodka spray-on deodorant


You'll Need:

- non-flavored, non-sweetened vodka (40% alcohol or more)
- essential oils (optional)
- a sterile spray nozzle container


Directions:

1. Fill your container with vodka. If you want a little fragrance to it, add a few drops of your favorite essential oil.
2. Close up the container, and you're done!

To Use:

Spray under your armpits or anywhere else you need deodorizing, and you're good to go. If you added essential oils to the mix, remember to shake well before use. This is pretty much the same recipe as what I use to deodorize fabrics.

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For apple cider vinegar / white vinegar spray-on deodorant  


You'll Need:

- organic apple cider vinegar or white vinegar
- distilled water
- essential oils (optional)
- a sterile spray nozzle container

Directions:

1. Fill your container with one part vinegar and one part distilled water. If you want a little fragrance to it, add a few drops of your favorite essential oil.
2. Close up the container, and you're done!

To Use:

Shake well before use, and spray under your armpits or anywhere else you need deodorizing, and you're good to go.

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I personally think the vodka deodorant works better than the vinegar deodorant, but to each their own. Regardless, they're both cheaper, more natural and healthier alternatives than many store-bought deodorants.

Out of the natural deodorants I've made, I prefer using vodka as a spray-on deodorant because I think it's easier to use, less messy to apply and it's not as abrasive as coconut oil solid deodorants and baking soda / cornstarch powder deodorants. The only downside, I would say, is that vodka deodorant is not as long-lasting, which is why I always keep a small spray bottle or roll-on bottle of vodka with me in my bag just in case I need it on the go.

How to Make a Beeswax Candle


I love candles. I find the small, orange glow of a flickering flame to be very comforting, and they're great for setting a calm, soothing atmosphere. However, I hate buying them. Many candles available in stores are overpriced, don't smell quite right - and worst of all - are made of paraffin. And since I previously wrote a post on the dangers of paraffin candles, I thought I should post instructions on how you can make your own beeswax candles!

How to Make a Candle Out of Beeswax

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You'll Need:


- beeswax (preferably pellets, but if you're working with a block of beeswax try to chop it up or grate it as best you can)
- a glass cup or jar (clean, empty jam jars work great)
- cotton string or twine (or similar material that can be used as a wick)
- small piece of cardboard
- a pencil, chopstick, etc. (basically a tool that is long and thin)
- essential oils (optional)
- food coloring (optional)

Directions:

1. Measure out the beeswax you'll need to fill your jar. Overestimate a little, as when the wax melts and settles in the jar it'll reduce a bit in volume and you'll need more to top it off.
2. Melt the beeswax in a double boiler.







How to Make a Candle Out of Beeswax
3. As the beeswax is melting, cut a your candle wick several centimeters longer than the height of your candle.









How to Make a Candle Out of Beeswax
4. Attach one end of your wick around the small piece of cardboard by either tying it or cutting a groove in the cardboard for it to hold on to. By this time there should be some beeswax melted in your double boiler. With a dropper or spoon, place a few drops of melted wax on the center bottom of the jar. It should harden into a soft solid fairly quickly. Press the cardboard into the wax to anchor the wick to the bottom.



How to Make a Candle Out of Beeswax
5. Wrap the other end of the wick around a pencil or chopstick, and gently pull the wick taut so that it stands straight up from the bottom of the jar, but not so hard that you yank out the anchor.
6. Once your beeswax is melted, take it off the heat. Mix in essential oils if you want to add fragrance to your candle. Add food coloring if you want it colored. I usually find a lot more food coloring than I originally thought was necessary is needed to make a strong color show through in the wax.
7. This part is tricky. Carefully pour the wax into the jar without pouring it over the pencil or chopstick that is holding up the string. But you also want to coat the part of the wick that will be protruding from the candle so that it will be easier to light later on.
How to Make a Candle Out of Beeswax
8. Wait for the candle to cool a bit. After awhile, you may notice that it isn't evenly meeting the sides of the jar and seems to sink into self, creating a concave depression on its surface. If you have any wax left, pour that over the top. This will help fill the depression and hopefully also fill in the any spaces between the wax and the jar.

How to Make a Candle Out of Beeswax
9. Wait for the candle to cool down completely. This may take awhile. Once you're sure it's completely solid, gently trim the wick to a reasonable length. Trimming it to about 1 cm generally works fine.

To Use:

Light your homemade candle as you would any other candle, and enjoy.
How to Make a Candle Out of Beeswax

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Have fun with this by trying out different scents, colors and by putting labels and tags on your candles. They make great gifts.

You can buy metal tabs to help you anchor your wick, but I don't like to use those because when the candle melts to the point where the flame meets the tab, it'll burn and release into the air whatever toxins are in the coating of the metal. This is also the reason why I prefer using cotton string or twine to make my wicks, rather than buy ready-made ones, as those often also have traces of silver in them to make the wick burner hotter. Completely unnecessary and unhealthy, in my opinion.

And just a few reminders about safety ...

Even though this candle is in a glass jar, it's still important to never leave an open flame unattended. Also, before each use, make sure you keep the candle wick trimmed so that it is always roughly 1 cm in length. This will help keep the candle burning neatly and prevent the flame from getting away from you and becoming a fire hazard.

If you're interested, you can also try making a candle using a tangerine!
How to Make a Candle Out of Beeswax

Health Dangers of Paraffin Wax Candles


For those of you who don't know, not all candles are created equal. Like with many things, you should always look into the ingredients that go into candles before using them. Use candles that are only made of beeswax, not paraffin wax.

Health Dangers of Paraffin Wax Candles
 
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Paraffin Wax is Toxic

Paraffin wax is basically a byproduct of crude oil, only filtered, dyed and molded into pretty shapes to make it appealing as candles. This stuff is incredibly bad for your health, and you this if you pay attention to how paraffin candles burn. You'll notice that they burn a foul-smelling black smoke, especially when you blow out the flame. This smoke is basically soot and chemical residue from the candle, and you're breathing it into your lungs. Putting the candle out doesn't immediately solve the problem either, as anything that was burned clings to surfaces and gets recirculated anytime an air current moves past.

Use Beeswax Candles Instead

This is why it's always best to use beeswax candles instead. Not only are beeswax candles made of a more natural, environmentally friendly ingredient, they burn cleaner and longer. They burn clean because the only thing being burned is natural beeswax. They burn longer because they have a much higher melting point. If you're using a candle made of pure beeswax with no additives, you may even notice the slight scent of honey in the air when burning it.


Beeswax Candles Produce Negative Ions?

Some claim that beeswax candles also help clean the air when being burned by producing negative ions. The way that negative ions help clean the air is by purifying bacteria and viruses, and changing the static charge of allergens such as dust and pollen so that they fall to the floor, instead of lingering in the air waiting to be inhaled into your lungs.

That said, I would be remiss if I didn't point out that I can't vouch for this claim. Although I'm aware of the health benefits of negative ions, I haven't been able to find any actual scientific studies to back up the claim that beeswax candles do, in fact, produce more of them. I know many blogs claim that this is true, but none of ones I've seen have provided any proof of this, and I don't want to be just another person spreading misinformation. So believe what you will.

If anyone can find a concrete study proving that beeswax candles do actually produce negative ions, let me know in the comments below! I'd really appreciate it.


Other Types of "Natural" Candles

I'm aware that there are other candles that are touted as natural and environmentally friendly, such as soy wax candles. But soy wax is often misrepresented as being completely natural, when in fact, it is filled with additives and other byproducts. I personally think natural, organic beeswax is much easier to come by, which is why I think it's better to stick with that particular type of candle instead.

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Hope you found this post helpful for when you're picking out your next candle!

Try your hand at making your own beeswax candle, or try making one out of a tangerine!