Make a Guitar/Ukulele Pick Out of Credit Cards


If you play the guitar or ukulele and are in need of a new pick, all you need is an old credit card and a pair of scissors.

Make a Guitar/Ukulele Pick Out of Credit CardsMaking your own guitar or ukulele pick is as easy as drawing a pattern into an old credit or debit card, and carefully cutting out the shape. You can trace an existing pick, find patterns online, or even create entirely new shapes and patterns. These make great customized gifts for family and friends too.

Make a Guitar/Ukulele Pick Out of Credit CardsMake a Guitar/Ukulele Pick Out of Credit CardsOf course, you can also use a pick cutter or pick puncher, but if you're careful, a pair of scissors works just as well.

Just because a credit card is expired, doesn't mean you can't still get some use out of it!


How to Make Wool Dryer Balls for Laundry


Fabric softeners and dryer sheets are terrible. They're filled with/covered in chemicals that leave a tacky film and toxins on your clothing that can cause allergies and skin irritation, not to mention you're spending money on something that will ultimately become waste that is bad for the environment.

If you're looking for a way to dry your clothing a little faster while keeping laundry soft, no need to turn to commercial fabric softeners, all you need are a couple of wool dryer walls. The friction and tumbling of wool dryer balls help prevent clothes from tangling, allowing them to dry faster, while also reducing static cling!




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You'll Need:

- 100% wool yarn
- acrylic yarn (optional)
- essential oils (optional)

Directions:

How to Make Wool Dryer Balls for Laundry
1. You can choose to make your entire dryer ball out of wool, but if you're have some cheaper spare acrylic yarn laying around, use that instead to create the core of the dryer ball. Simply wind some yarn around two or three fingers a dozen times, then wind in the other direction to cinch it together, then just keep going, periodically changing up the direction so that it gradually forms a ball.

How to Make Wool Dryer Balls for Laundry
2. When your core is about 5 centimeters wide, tuck the loose end tightly into the ball by stuffing it under the other layers, and switch to 100% wool. If you decided to start with wool, then just keep going until the ball is about 7-8 centimeters across; this is a little bigger than a tennis ball. However, you can make your dryer balls as small or as wide as you like. I find slightly bigger ones seem to work better.

3. When you've wound the dryer ball to the size you like, pull the loose end through the other layers and make sure it's tucked into the ball tightly.

4. Now, you need to make sure the wool dryer ball stays together. To do this, first stuff your dryer balls into some old panty hose, stockings or socks. And tie off the end so that it stays snugly in there.

How to Make Wool Dryer Balls for Laundry
Old socks don't work as well, but they're all I had.
5. Run the dryer balls in their pouches through a regular wash of laundry. After that, run it through the dryer along with your wet laundry. What this does is help felt the wool inside the stocking by causing friction and agitation, ensuring that the wool binds together.

6. Take the wool dryer balls out of their pouches, and they're ready to use! If they aren't quite felted to your liking, just put them back in your stocking or sock and put them through the washing/drying laundry process again to felt them more.

7. Before you start using your wool dryer balls, feel free to pour a few drops of essential oil onto them before tossing them into the laundry machine to scent your clothes with the fragrance of your choice.

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How to Make Wool Dryer Balls for Laundry These wool dryer balls aren't only economical and help save on electricity bills, they also last a long time — two years at least; an easy peasy way to cut back on carbon emissions. If you're feeling particularly crafty, you can use different colored yarn to wind patterns and images into your dryer balls as well!

There are some environmentally friendly wool dryer walls available for purchase on the market, but why buy them when you can easily make them yourself?